Fishing for romance this summer? Don’t catch a catfish!

ID-100216914When I was younger I was happy to catch a catfish. Happy to eat it too if it was big enough. These days, “catfish” has another meaning: someone who assumes another person’s identity and creates a fake online profile to take part in an online relationship.

Summer can be a hot time for romance, but Better Business Bureau warns consumers to be wary of logging on to an online romance scam.

The “catfish” is often looking for personal information and/or financial support. They put a lot of time and effort into building a fake persona and relationship with their victim(s).

According to the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), more than 10 percent of all reported online financial losses involved romance scams; a financial loss for females of over $46,000 to males $9,000.

When considering an online dating service, BBB recommends you:

Research in advance.  Check out the dating service online at bbb.org to review their history of complaints and reputation with consumers.

Select with integrity.  Request in writing what guidelines the company follows in screening its applicants. For example, does the service conduct a criminal background check and sex offender screening for each applicant?

Read the fine print. Specifically keep an extra eye for free trial offers and deals. Some require you to cancel before the trial offer ends in order to avoid recurring charges.  Be sure the contract lists out payment plans, length of contract and refund and cancellation policies in case you are dissatisfied with the company’s service. For payment, use your credit card for extra protection.

Put safety first. Inquire about the company’s policy on disclosure of personal information. Avoid putting too much personal information on your profile, such as home address, work information and telephone number.

Inquire about cost. Make certain you understand the company’s pricing policies before agreeing to the terms of service. Find out if refunds are offered and what conditions determine the refund amount.

To avoid ‘catfishing’ scams, BBB suggests:

Read the signs. Be wary of profiles that lack photographs and information in the “About Me” section, as well as individuals who make the following claims: to have fallen instantly in love or to be from the U.S. and traveling or working overseas. Beware of those who prey on your emotions by claiming to be trapped in a foreign country or involved in an emergency, and needing you to wire them money. This is a red flag for a ‘catfishing’ scam.

Create a separate email. Only use this account for online dating. Not only is it an easy way to keep dating emails separate from personal and professional emails, it also keeps your primary email address private.

Speak on the phone/meet in person. It is easier to spot a fraud over the phone than online. If it’s possible, ask to meet in person and always in a safe, public place.

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